Aphasia

Aphasia affects the ability to process language, including formulation and comprehension of language and speech, as well as the ability to read or write. Here is the latest research on aphasia.

September 15, 2020
Case Report
Open Access

Identification of penumbra in acute ischemic stroke using multimodal MR imaging analysis: A case report study

Radiology Case Reports
Forough Sodaei, Vahid Shahmaei
September 12, 2020
Case Report

Management for a patient of moyamoya disease presenting with ischemic stroke in the first trimester of pregnancy

Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases : the Official Journal of National Stroke Association
Masashi WatanabeShiro Ohue
September 22, 2020

Effects of executive attention on sentence processing in aphasia

Aphasiology
Eleni PeristeriKyrana Tsapkini
September 16, 2020
Review
Open Access

Bedside Coagulation Tests in Diagnosing Venom-Induced Consumption Coagulopathy in Snakebite

Toxins
Supun WedasinghaAnjana Silva
September 3, 2020
Case Report
Open Access

A case of aphasia due to temporobasal edema: Contemporary models of language anatomy are clinically relevant

Surgical Neurology International
Werner SurbeckFelix Scholtes
September 10, 2020
Review
Open Access

The Role of Gesture in Communication and Cognition: Implications for Understanding and Treating Neurogenic Communication Disorders

Frontiers in Human Neuroscience
Sharice Clough, Melissa C Duff
September 3, 2020

Alzheimer's disease: a biological disorder?

La Revue du praticien
Jacques Hugon
September 17, 2020
Preprint

Overt and covert prosody are reflected in neurophysiological responses previously attributed to grammatical processing

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Anastasia GlushkoK. Steinhauer
September 13, 2020

Aphasia and acquired reading impairments: What are the high-tech alternatives to compensate for reading deficits?

International Journal of Language & Communication Disorders
Giorgia CistolaIneke van der Meulen
September 15, 2020

Posterior Cingulate Cortex Hypometabolism in Non-Amnestic Variants of Alzheimer's Disease

Journal of Alzheimer's Disease : JAD
David BergeronRobert Laforce
September 22, 2020

COMPARING FINGERPRINTS FOR LIGAND-BASED VIRTUAL SCREENING: A FAST, SCALABLE APPROACH FOR UNBIASED EVALUATION

Journal of Chemical Information and Modeling
Lewis James Martin, Michael T Bowen
September 13, 2020

Slowed Compensation Responses to Altered Auditory Feedback in Post-Stroke Aphasia: Implications for Speech Sensorimotor Integration

Journal of Communication Disorders
Lorelei Phillip JohnsonJulius Fridriksson
September 19, 2020

Local syntactic violations evoke fast mismatch-related neural activity detected by optical neuroimaging

Experimental Brain Research
Mikio KubotaGeorge Zouridakis
September 20, 2020

Common and Distinct Neural Substrates of Sentence Production and Comprehension

NeuroImage
Sladjana LukicDavid Caplan
September 18, 2020
Case Report

A Case of Radiation-induced Glioblastoma 29 Years after Treatments for Germinoma

No shinkei geka. Neurological surgery
Ayaka MatsuoKeisuke Tsutsumi
September 10, 2020

Writing errors in primary progressive aphasia

Applied Neuropsychology. Adult
Maria Rita Lo MonacoMaria Caterina Silveri
September 3, 2020
Open Access

The dual origin of lexical perseverations in aphasia: Residual activation and incremental learning

Neuropsychologia
Christopher R Hepner, Nazbanou Nozari
September 3, 2020
Case Report

Brain aspergilloma in an immunocompetent individual: A case report

Surgical Neurology International
João Ribeiro MemóriaHerika Karla Negri Brito de Vasconcelos

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