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Basal Ganglia

Basal Ganglia diagram by Designua, Shutterstock
Designua, Shutterstock

Basal Ganglia are a group of subcortical nuclei in the brain associated with control of voluntary motor movements, procedural and habit learning, emotion, and cognition. Here is the latest research.

Top 20 most recent papers
Nature Reviews. Neurology

Perivascular spaces in the brain: anatomy, physiology and pathology

Nature Reviews. NeurologyFebruary 26, 2020
Joanna M Wardlawcolleagues from the Fondation Leducq Transatlantic Network of Excellence on the Role of the Perivascular Space in Cerebral S
31
Journal of Affective Disorders

Neuroanatomical predictors of L-DOPA response in older adults with psychomotor slowing and depression: A pilot study

Journal of Affective DisordersFebruary 25, 2020
Bret R RutherfordSteven P Roose
Science Advances

Endocannabinoid genetic variation enhances vulnerability to THC reward in adolescent female mice

Science AdvancesFebruary 26, 2020
Caitlin E BurgdorfAnjali M Rajadhyaksha
Investigative Radiology

No Changes in T1 Relaxometry After a Mean of 11 Administrations of Gadobutrol

Investigative RadiologyFebruary 26, 2020
Katerina Deike-HofmannAlexander Radbruch
1
Journal of Affective Disorders

The basal ganglia: A central hub for the psychomotor effects of electroconvulsive therapy

Journal of Affective DisordersFebruary 25, 2020
Jan-Baptist BelgePhilip van Eijndhoven
Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society

Identifying the Functional Brain Network of Motor Reserve in Early Parkinson's Disease

Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder SocietyFebruary 26, 2020
Seok Jong ChungYoung H Sohn
1

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