Blood Brain Barrier Regulation in Health & Disease

The BBB is essential in regulating the movement of molecules and substances in and out of the brain. Disruption to the BBB and changes in permeability allows pathogens and inflammatory molecules to cross the barrier and may play a part in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Here is the latest research on BBB regulation in health and disease.

July 2, 2020
Review
Open Access

Androgens' effects on cerebrovascular function in health and disease

Biology of Sex Differences
Charly Abi-GhanemKristen L Zuloaga
June 21, 2020
Review
Open Access

Impact of the Renin-Angiotensin System on the Endothelium in Vascular Dementia: Unresolved Issues and Future Perspectives

International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Fatima Y NoureddineFouad A Zouein
June 13, 2020
Open Access

PD-1 inhibitors: Do they have a future in the treatment of glioblastoma?

Clinical Cancer Research : an Official Journal of the American Association for Cancer Research
Mustafa KhasrawJohn H Sampson
June 26, 2020
Open Access

Distinctive subpopulations of stromal cells are present in human lymph nodes infiltrated with melanoma

Cancer Immunology Research
Jennifer EomP Rod Dunbar
June 17, 2020
Review
Open Access

Oxidative Stress and Microvessel Barrier Dysfunction

Frontiers in Physiology
Pingnian HeFeng Gao
June 21, 2020

In Vitro Models of the Blood-Brain Barrier

Handbook of Experimental Pharmacology
Winfried Neuhaus
July 1, 2020

Quercetin protects against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion and oxygen glucose deprivation/reoxygenation neurotoxicity

The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry
Ya-Yu WangChun-Jung Chen

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