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Brain-Computer Interface

Brain-Computer Interface diagram by rumruay, Shutterstock
rumruay, Shutterstock

A brain-computer interface, also known as a brain-machine interface, is a bi-directional communication pathway between an external device and a wired brain. Here is the latest research on this topic.

Top 20 most recent papers
Muscle & Nerve

Brain-Computer Interfaces for Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

Muscle & NerveFebruary 9, 2020
Dennis J McFarland
1
The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience

Electrocorticogram (ECoG) is highly informative in primate visual cortex

The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for NeuroscienceFebruary 19, 2020
Sidrat Tasawoor Kanth, Supratim Ray
Chemical Science

A macrocyclic oligofuran: synthesis, solid state structure and electronic properties

Chemical ScienceFebruary 15, 2020
Sandip V MulayOri Gidron
Journal of Neuroscience Methods

LFP-Net: A Deep Learning Framework to Recognize Human Behavioral Activities using Brain STN-LFP Signals

Journal of Neuroscience MethodsFebruary 7, 2020
Hosein M GolshanMohammad H Mahoor
1
Nature Biomedical Engineering

Reconfigurable nanophotonic silicon probes for sub-millisecond deep-brain optical stimulation

Nature Biomedical EngineeringFebruary 14, 2020
Aseema MohantyMichal Lipson
12
Journal of Neural Engineering

Graph theory analysis of directed functional brain networks in major depressive disorder based on EEG signal

Journal of Neural EngineeringFebruary 14, 2020
Fatemeh HasanzadehReza Rostami
Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications

Towards optogenetic approaches for hearing restoration

Biochemical and Biophysical Research CommunicationsFebruary 9, 2020
Tobias Moser, Alexander Dieter
Journal of Medical Ethics

'Delusional' consent in somatic treatment: the emblematic case of electroconvulsive therapy

Journal of Medical EthicsFebruary 15, 2020
Giuseppe BersaniAngela Iannitelli
Brain : a Journal of Neurology

Subthalamic nucleus activity dynamics and limb movement prediction in Parkinson's disease

Brain : a Journal of NeurologyFebruary 11, 2020
Saed KhawaldehPeter Brown
47
bioRxiv

Presynaptic inhibition rapidly stabilises recurrent excitation in the face of plasticity

bioRxivFebruary 12, 2020
Laura Bella Naumann, Henning Sprekeler
17
IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and Systems

A 300 Mbps 37 pJ/bit UWB-Based Transcutaneous Optical Biotelemetry Link

IEEE Transactions on Biomedical Circuits and SystemsFebruary 15, 2020
Andrea De MarcellisTimothy Constandinou
Sensors

Multi-Channel Neural Recording Implants: A Review

SensorsFebruary 13, 2020
Fereidoon Hashemi NoshahrMohamad Sawan
Pain Medicine : the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain Medicine

A Systematic Literature Review of Brain Neurostimulation Therapies for the Treatment of Pain

Pain Medicine : the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pain MedicineFebruary 9, 2020
Timothy R DeerAlon Y Mogilner
1
Journal of Stroke

Rewiring the Lesioned Brain: Electrical Stimulation for Post-Stroke Motor Restoration

Journal of StrokeFebruary 7, 2020
Shi-Chun BaoRaymond Kai-Yu Tong
JMIR Mental Health

Brief, Web-Based Interventions to Motivate Smokers With Schizophrenia: Randomized Trial

JMIR Mental HealthFebruary 11, 2020
Mary F BrunetteHaiyi Xie
1
1

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