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GRIP1 in Myeloid Cells in Neuroinflammation

GRIP1 in Myeloid Cells in Neuroinflammation diagram by Fu et al, PLOS One
Fu et al, PLOS One

GRIP1 is a glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 and myeloid cells consists of granulocytes and monocytes, before they have differentiated and are derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The interaction between GRIP1 and myeloid cells in inflammation is in the early stages. Here is the latest research on GRIP1 and myeloid cells in inflammation.

Top 20 most recent papers
March 19, 2020
ReviewOpen Access

Potential Therapeutic Approaches for Cerebral Amyloid Angiopathy and Alzheimer's Disease

International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Masashi TanakaMasafumi Ihara
January 10, 2020
Open Access

Innate signaling within the central nervous system recruits protective neutrophils

Acta Neuropathologica Communications
Reza KhorooshiTrevor Owens
March 10, 2020
Open Access

Angiopoietin-2 blockade ameliorates autoimmune neuroinflammation by inhibiting leukocyte recruitment into the CNS

The Journal of Clinical Investigation
Zhilin LiKari Alitalo
April 14, 2020

NLRP3 inflammasome as prognostic factor and therapeutic target in primary progressive multiple sclerosis patients

Brain : a Journal of Neurology
Sunny MalhotraManuel Comabella
January 11, 2020
Open Access

Microglia and macrophage phenotypes in intracerebral haemorrhage injury: therapeutic opportunities

Brain : a Journal of Neurology
Qian BaiV Wee Yong
December 11, 2019

Convergence between Microglia and Peripheral Macrophages Phenotype during Development and Neuroinflammation

The Journal of Neuroscience : the Official Journal of the Society for Neuroscience
Francesca GrassivaroGianvito Martino
February 26, 2020
Open Access

STAT3 signaling in myeloid cells promotes pathogenic myelin-specific T cell differentiation and autoimmune demyelination

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Hsueh Chung LuJianrong Li
April 5, 2020

Depletion of brain perivascular macrophages regulates acute restraint stress-induced neuroinflammation and oxidative/nitrosative stress in rat frontal cortex

European Neuropsychopharmacology : the Journal of the European College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Aline SaydBorja Garcia-Bueno
November 16, 2019
Open Access

Cellular source of hypothalamic macrophage accumulation in diet-induced obesity

Journal of Neuroinflammation
Chan Hee LeeMin-Seon Kim
January 31, 2020
Open Access

CHIT1 at Diagnosis Reflects Long-Term Multiple Sclerosis Disease Activity

Annals of Neurology
Emanuela OldoniAn Goris
November 15, 2019
Open Access

C-type lectin receptors Mcl and Mincle control development of multiple sclerosis-like neuroinflammation

The Journal of Clinical Investigation
Marie N'diayeMaja Jagodic
December 6, 2019
Open Access

Differences of Microglia in the Brain and the Spinal Cord

Frontiers in Cellular Neuroscience
Fang-Ling XuanLi Tian
February 8, 2020

Microglia-Related Gene Triggering Receptor Expressed in Myeloid Cells 2 (TREM2) Is Upregulated in the Substantia Nigra of Progressive Supranuclear Palsy

Movement Disorders : Official Journal of the Movement Disorder Society
Javier Sánchez-Ruiz de GordoaMaite Mendioroz
February 12, 2020
Review

Microglia heterogeneity and neurodegeneration: The emerging paradigm of the role of immunity in Alzheimer's disease

Journal of Neuroimmunology
Arsalan Hashemiaghdam, Magdalena Mroczek

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