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Innate Immunity: Neurodegeneration

Innate Immunity: Neurodegeneration diagram by Designua, Shutterstock
Designua, Shutterstock

The innate immune system is a first line of defense against infection. Pathological states can occur if there is over activation of the innate immune system, particularly in the. The excessive activation of these cells can lead to inflammation and neurodegenerative diseases. Here is the latest research on innate immunity and neurodegeneration.

Top 20 most recent papers
Neuroscience Letters

Extracellular vesicles in the oligodendrocyte microenvironment

Neuroscience LettersMarch 26, 2020
Eva-Maria Krämer-Albers
3
The Journal of Biological Chemistry

Tracking isotopically labeled oxidants using boronate-based redox probes

The Journal of Biological ChemistryMarch 29, 2020
Natalia RiosJacek Zielonka
3
International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Abnormal Upregulation of GPR17 Receptor Contributes to Oligodendrocyte Dysfunction in SOD1 G93A Mice

International Journal of Molecular SciencesApril 5, 2020
Elisabetta BonfantiMarta Fumagalli
1
BMC Medical Genomics

Dense module searching for gene networks associated with multiple sclerosis

BMC Medical GenomicsApril 4, 2020
Astrid M ManuelZhongming Zhao
2
Progress in Brain Research

The role of glia in Parkinson's disease: Emerging concepts and therapeutic applications

Progress in Brain ResearchApril 6, 2020
Katarzyna Z KuterAnna R Carta
International Journal of Molecular Sciences

Exploring the Etiological Links behind Neurodegenerative Diseases: Inflammatory Cytokines and Bioactive Kynurenines

International Journal of Molecular SciencesApril 5, 2020
Masaru TanakaLászló Vécsei
Neurobiology of Aging

Leucine-rich repeat kinase-2 (LRRK2) modulates microglial phenotype and dopaminergic neurodegeneration

Neurobiology of AgingApril 6, 2020
Zach DwyerCLINT (Canadian LRRK2 in inflammation team)
International Journal of Clinical and Experimental Pathology

Protective effects of histone deacetylase inhibition by Scriptaid on brain injury in neonatal rat models of cerebral ischemia and hypoxia

International Journal of Clinical and Experimental PathologyMarch 27, 2020
Qingmei MengFengxian Hu
1
The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

Microglia and other myeloid cells in CNS health and disease

The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental TherapeuticsApril 3, 2020
Adithya GopinathWolfgang Streit
Journal of Neuroinflammation

Role of dietary fatty acids in microglial polarization in Alzheimer's disease

Journal of NeuroinflammationMarch 27, 2020
Smita Eknath Desale, Subashchandrabose Chinnathambi
3
1
Frontiers in Cell and Developmental Biology

The Role of Autophagy in Glaucomatous Optic Neuropathy

Frontiers in Cell and Developmental BiologyMarch 27, 2020
Annagrazia AdornettoRossella Russo
Acta Neuropathologica

PTEN activation contributes to neuronal and synaptic engulfment by microglia in tauopathy

Acta NeuropathologicaApril 3, 2020
Joseph BenetatosJürgen Götz
6
1

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