Feed Preview

Misfolding & Aggregation Diseases

Misfolding & Aggregation Diseases diagram by Juan Gaertner, Shutterstock
Juan Gaertner, Shutterstock

Misfolding and aggregation of proteins can lead to several diseases. For instance, misfolding of prion or tau proteins are associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Here is the latest research on diseases caused by protein misfolding and aggregation.

Top 20 most recent papers
Biological Psychiatry

The β-Secretase BACE1 in Alzheimer's Disease

Biological PsychiatryApril 1, 2020
Harald HampelAndrea Vergallo
Genes & Development

Embryo integrity regulates maternal proteostasis and stress resilience

Genes & DevelopmentMarch 29, 2020
Ambre J SalaRichard I Morimoto
3
BMC Biology

Protein assembly systems in natural and synthetic biology

BMC BiologyMarch 29, 2020
Giulio ChiesaAhmad S Khalil
28
Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience

Protein Aggregation and Dysfunction of Autophagy-Lysosomal Pathway: A Vicious Cycle in Lysosomal Storage Diseases

Frontiers in Molecular NeuroscienceMarch 29, 2020
Antonio Monaco, Alessandro Fraldi
The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care Surgery

Identification of Injury and Shock Driven Effects on Ex-Vivo Platelet Aggregometry: A Cautionary Tale of Phenotyping

The Journal of Trauma and Acute Care SurgeryMarch 29, 2020
Nichole E StarrLucy Z Kornblith
1
Journal of the American Chemical Society

Electrostatic Interactions Control the Functionality of Bacterial Ice Nucleators

Journal of the American Chemical SocietyApril 1, 2020
Max LukasKonrad Meister
NPJ Biofilms and Microbiomes

The biofilm-associated surface protein Esp of Enterococcus faecalis forms amyloid-like fibers

NPJ Biofilms and MicrobiomesMarch 30, 2020
Agustina TaglialegnaJaione Valle
5

See more papers from this feed

Related Feeds

ALS

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is associated with the death of neurons that control voluntary muscles. Discover the latest research on ALS here.

ALS & FTD: TDP-43

ALS shares with a considerable proportion of FTD cases the same neuropathological substrate, namely, inclusions of abnormally phosphorylated protein tdp-43 (ptdp-43). Here are the latest discoveries pertaining to ptdp-43 and these diseases.

ALS - Pathogenic Mechanisms

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by muscle weakness. Here is the latest research investigating pathogenic mechanisms that underlie this genetically heterogeneous disorder.

ALS - Phenotypes

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by muscle weakness. Here is the latest research investigating phenotypes associated with this genetically heterogeneous disorder.

ALS: Genetics

Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by muscle weakness. ALS is a genetically heterogeneous disorder with several causative genes. Here are the latest discoveries pertaining to the genetics of this disease.

ALS: Prions

Prions are misfolded proteins which characterize several fatal neurodegenerative diseases. Prion-like mechanisms are associated with the pathogenesis of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS). Here are the latest discoveries pertaining to this disease.

ALS: Stress Granules

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease characterized by cytoplasmic protein aggregates within motor neurons. TDP-43 is an ALS-linked protein that is known to regulate splicing and storage of specific mRNAs into stress granules, which have been implicated in formation of ALS protein aggregates. Here is the latest research.

ALS: Therapies

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), also known as motor neuron disease, is associated with the death of neurons that control voluntary muscles. Discover the latest research on ALS therapies here.

ALS: Transposon de-silencing

Transposon silencing is a form of transcriptional gene silencing. These gene silencing mechanisms are impaired in Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Here are the latest discoveries pertaining to transposon silencing and this disease.

Age-related Dementia

Age-related dementia (Alzheimer's disease) results from the destructive impact of the pulse on cerebral vasculature. Evidence is reviewed that the neuropathology of the dementia is caused by the breakdown of small cerebral vessels (silent microbleeds), that the microbleeds result from pulse-induced damage to the cerebral vessels, and that pulse becomes increasingly destructive with age, because of the age-related stiffening of the aorta and great arteries, which causes an increase in the intensity of the pressure pulse. Discover the latest research on age-related dementia here.

© 2020 Meta ULC. All rights reserved
/feed-previews/misfolding-aggregation-diseases/c1d6d464-2924-4167-a6ab-6fc6d69c1321