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Parkinson's Disease: Animal Models

Parkinson's Disease: Animal Models diagram by joshya, Shutterstock
joshya, Shutterstock

Parkinson’s disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder that affects movement. This feed focuses on animal models used for Parkinson's disease research.

Top 20 most recent papers
Brain Research

Human organoids to model the developing human neocortex in health and disease

Brain ResearchApril 3, 2020
Shokoufeh KhakipoorSimone Mayer
1
Neurobiology of Disease

APOE in Alzheimer's disease and neurodegeneration

Neurobiology of DiseaseMarch 27, 2020
D Allan Butterfield, Lance A Johnson
1
FASEB Journal : Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

BMAL1 regulation of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in MPTP-induced Parkinson's disease mouse model

FASEB Journal : Official Publication of the Federation of American Societies for Experimental BiologyApril 5, 2020
Wen-Wen LiuChun-Feng Liu
Neurobiology of Disease

Effects of exercise on sleep in neurodegenerative disease

Neurobiology of DiseaseApril 4, 2020
Adeel A MemonAmy W Amara
23
Brain Research

Associations between sounds and actions in primate prefrontal cortex

Brain ResearchMarch 21, 2020
Ying Huang, Michael Brosch
Journal of Cellular Physiology

Glucose, glycolysis, and neurodegenerative diseases

Journal of Cellular PhysiologyApril 3, 2020
Bor Luen Tang
6

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