Secondary Parkinson disease

Secondary Parkinson disease refers to a group of disorders that present similarly to Parkinson disease but have different etiology. Secondary Parkinson disease is caused due to the blockade of or interference in dopamine’s action in the basal ganglia. Here is the latest research.

July 16, 2020
Open Access

Peripheral Dopamine 2-Receptor Antagonist Reverses Hypertension in a Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Rat Model

International Journal of Molecular Sciences
Elena OleaAngela Gomez-Niño
July 1, 2020
Open Access

Translational Development Strategies for TAK-063, a Phosphodiesterase 10A Inhibitor

The International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology
Thomas A MacekHaruhide Kimura
July 15, 2020

The mGluR2/3 agonist pomaglumetad methionil normalizes aberrant dopamine neuron activity via action in the ventral hippocampus

Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Susan F Sonnenschein, Anthony A Grace
July 30, 2020

Diagnostic and therapeutic challenges in neuroleptic malignant syndrome: a severe medical case

Rivista di psichiatria
Pasquale BrognaCinzia Niolu
August 2, 2020

Antidopaminergic antiemetics and trauma-related hospitalization: a population-based self-controlled case series study

British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology
Julien BezinAntoine Pariente
July 23, 2020

Unusual diagnostic findings in temporal lobe epilepsy: A combined MRI and 18 F-dopa case study

European Journal of Radiology Open
Paola FeracoUmberto Rozzanigo
July 30, 2020

Revisiting amantadine as a treatment for drug-induced movement disorders

Annals of Clinical Psychiatry : Official Journal of the American Academy of Clinical Psychiatrists
Stanley N CaroffJames F Morley
June 26, 2020
Open Access

Dilated Perivascular Space in the Midbrain May Reflect Dopamine Neuronal Degeneration in Parkinson's Disease

Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Yanxuan LiPeiyu Huang
June 26, 2020
Open Access

Translation Imaging in Parkinson's Disease: Focus on Neuroinflammation

Frontiers in Aging Neuroscience
Sara BelloliMaria Carla Gilardi
July 3, 2020

The role of dopamine dysregulation and evidence for the transdiagnostic nature of elevated dopamine synthesis in psychosis: a positron emission tomography (PET) study comparing schizophrenia, delusional disorder, and other psychotic disorders

Neuropsychopharmacology : Official Publication of the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology
Pak Wing Calvin ChengOliver D Howes
July 3, 2020
Case Report
Open Access

Anti-Dopamine Receptor 2 Antibody-Positive Encephalitis in Adolescent

Frontiers in Neurology
Xuejiao DaiSi Chen
July 8, 2020
Open Access

Dopamine role in learning and action inference

ELife
July 3, 2020

Safinamide Mesilate (Equfina® TABLETS 50 mg): preclinical and clinical pharmacodynamics, efficacy, and safety

Nihon yakurigaku zasshi. Folia pharmacologica Japonica
Michinori Koebisu, Takayuki Ishida
July 1, 2020

Monoamine oxidase A inhibition as monotherapy reverses parkinsonism in the MPTP-lesioned marmoset

Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Archives of Pharmacology
Adjia HamadjidaPhilippe Huot
July 28, 2020

Automated design and optimization of multitarget schizophrenia drug candidates by deep learning

European Journal of Medicinal Chemistry
Xiaoqin TanHualiang Jiang
June 26, 2020
Open Access

GSK-3β Contributes to Parkinsonian Dopaminergic Neuron Death: Evidence From Conditional Knockout Mice and Tideglusib

Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience
Junyu LiQiaoying Huang

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