Nov 6, 2003

2-methoxyestradiol strongly inhibits human uterine sarcomatous cell growth

Gynecologic Oncology
Frédéric AmantB G Lindeque

Abstract

The objective was to test the hypothesis that uterine sarcomatous cells are hormone-sensitive. We included 2-methoxyestradiol, an endogenous metabolite of estradiol with antiproliferative properties. Proliferation assays assessed the effects of estradiol, progesterone, tamoxifen, raloxifen, [D-Trp(6)]leuteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH), ICI 182,780 (faslodex or fulvestrant), and 2-methoxyestradiol on cell growth of a cell line derived from uterine carcinosarcoma, but consisting solely of mesenchymal cells (SK-UT-1). Morphological changes of SK-UT-1 cells after exposure to 2-methoxyestradiol were evaluated and fluorescence immunohistochemistry for tubulin was used to detect changes in the mitotic spindle. Flow cytometry was used to assess the influence of 2-methoxyestradiol on the SK-UT-1 cell cycle as well as the role of p53 in apoptosis. Cell proliferation analysis revealed that SK-UT-1 cells were stimulated by progesterone, tamoxifen, and [D-Trp(6)]LHRH. Cells were insensitive to estradiol, raloxifen, and ICI 182,780. Inhibition occurred after exposure to 2-methoxyestradiol and was accompanied by a threefold increase in the G2/M population, with a concomitant decrease in the G1 population, as shown by cell cycle ana...Continue Reading

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Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Flow Cytometry
Biochemical Pathway
Sarcoma
Immunohistochemistry
Uterine Carcinosarcoma
Progesterone, (9 beta,10 alpha)-Isomer
Uterus
Mitotic Spindle Apparatus
Uterine Cancer
Estradiol, (16 alpha,17 beta)-Isomer

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