A bedtime dose of ARB was better than a morning dose in improving baroreflex sensitivity and urinary albumin excretion--the J-TOP study

Clinical and Experimental Hypertension : CHE
Kazuo EguchiKazuomi Kario

Abstract

The hypothesis that the bedtime dosing of angiotensin receptor blocker (ARB) is superior to morning dose in improving baroreflex sensitivity (BRS) and urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR) was tested in this study. Baroreflex sensitivity was measured at baseline and at 6th month (N = 109) and was found to increase in the bedtime-dose group (P = .004), but not in the morning-dose group. The correlations between the change in BRS and the change in UACR were insignificant in the morning-dose group (r = 0.17, P = .26), but were significant in the bedtime-dose group (r = -0.29, P = .04). In conclusion, the improvement of BRS could be one of the mechanisms by which bedtime dosing of ARB confers renal protection.

References

May 16, 2002·Journal of Hypertension·Pierre LantelmeHugues Milon
Nov 27, 2002·Journal of Cardiovascular Pharmacology·Makoto HikosakaToshiji Iwasaka
Dec 18, 2004·Experimental Physiology·Edward J Johns
Aug 7, 2007·Advanced Drug Delivery Reviews·Francesco Portaluppi, Björn Lemmer
Oct 6, 2007·Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension·Kazuo EguchiKazuomi Kario
Mar 6, 2009·Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension·Toshio OgiharaUNKNOWN COLM study investigators

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Citations

Dec 15, 2015·Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension·Ramón C HermidaFrancesco Portaluppi
Apr 20, 2016·Pharmaceutics·Gagandeep KaurBandana Saini
Jun 17, 2020·Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy·Ramón C HermidaJosé R Fernández
Sep 18, 2020·Expert Opinion on Drug Metabolism & Toxicology·Ramón C HermidaJosé R Fernández
Jun 13, 2015·American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology·Chevelle BrudeyPaul Marvar
Mar 14, 2018·Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension·Ramón C HermidaJosé R Fernández

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