DOI: 10.1101/484063Nov 30, 2018Paper

A cell-of-origin epigenetic tracer reveals clinically distinct subtypes of high grade serous ovarian cancer

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Pietro Lo RisoGiuseppe Testa

Abstract

High grade serous ovarian cancer (HGSOC) is a major unmet need in oncology. The persistent uncertainty on its originating tissue has contributed to hamper the discovery of oncogenic pathways and effective therapies. Here we define the DNA methylation print that distinguishes the human fimbrial (FI) and ovarian surface epithelia (OSE) and develop a robust epigenetic cell-of-origin tracer that stratifies HGSOC in FI- and OSE-originated tumors across all available cohorts. We translate this origin-based stratification into a clinically actionable transcriptomic signature, demonstrating its prognostic impact on patients' survival and identifying novel network level dysregulations specific for the two disease subtypes.

Related Concepts

Neoplasms
Oncologic
Structure of Germinal Epithelium of Ovary
DNA Methylation
Subtype (Attribute)
Cohort
Subtypes (Disorders)
Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma
Stratification
Biochemical Pathway

Related Feeds

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.

Cancer Epigenetics & Metabolism (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may or may not provide advantages for the cancer cells. This feed focuses on the relationship between cell metabolism, epigenetics and tumor differentiation.

Cancer Epigenetics and Senescence (Keystone)

Epigenetic changes are present and dysregulated in many cancers, including DNA methylation, non-coding RNA segments and post-translational protein modifications. The epigenetic changes may be involved in regulating senescence in cancer cells. This feed captures the latest research on cancer epigenetics and senescence.

Cancer -Omics

A variety of different high-throughput technologies can be used to identify the complete catalog of changes that characterize the molecular profile of cohorts of tumor samples. Discover the latest insights gained from cancer 'omics' in this feed.