PMID: 2112640May 1, 1990

A double-blind clinical trial comparing the gastrointestinal side effects of two enteral feeding formulas

JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition
C ViallW P Steffee

Abstract

Adequate enteral nutritional support is often limited by gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. In this pilot clinical trial we compared an enteral nutrition formula based on soy hydrolysate (study formula, SF) against a widely used intact casein formula (control formula, CF) for the incidence of GI side effects in a completely randomized double blind design. Twenty-three nonsurgical hospitalized patients requiring enteral nutritional support and free of GI symptoms were randomly assigned to receive either the CF or the SF for 6 days continuously. Both formulas were isotonic, low in residue, lactose free and isocaloric, but differed in the type and concentration of protein and the concentration of medium-chain triglycerides. After randomization both groups were comparable in demographic characteristics, and nutritional status, but there were more patients on antibiotics in the CF group. The amount of formula infused per day and the route of administration were equivalent. The number of bowel movements per day was 1.0 +/- 0.5 for the CF group and 0.6 +/- 0.3 for the SF group (p less than 0.05). The incidence of diarrhea was 10.8% days for the CF group and 6.2% for the SF group (p = NS). High gastric residuals occurred in 16.9% of d...Continue Reading

References

Jan 1, 1979·Annals of Internal Medicine·S B HeymsfieldD Rudman
Jun 21, 1979·The New England Journal of Medicine·M H Sleisenger
Mar 1, 1989·JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·D M ZimmaroJ L Rombeau
May 1, 1987·Critical Care Medicine·R R Brinson, B E Kolts
Jul 1, 1988·JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·M M GottschlichJ W Alexander
Nov 1, 1983·JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·E L Cataldi-BetcherK W Jones
Mar 1, 1984·JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·H T Randall
Nov 1, 1984·JPEN. Journal of Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·K R AndersonC E Butterworth
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Citations

Mar 21, 1998·Journal of the American Dietetic Association·J E DietscherR W Smith
May 1, 1997·Nutrition·J P VelezJ I Restrepo
Jun 11, 2002·Gastroenterology Nursing : the Official Journal of the Society of Gastroenterology Nurses and Associates·P G Eisenberg
Dec 1, 1990·Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·G K Grimble, D B Silk
Jun 1, 1993·Nutrition in Clinical Practice : Official Publication of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition·P G Eisenberg
Sep 1, 1999·Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition·M L WahlqvistW Lukito
Aug 11, 2017·Journal of Oleo Science·Tetsuro AkashiHiroshi Nishiyama

Related Concepts

Casein A
Clinical Trials
Diarrhea
Gastrointestinal System
Double-Blind Method
Force Feeding
Food, Formulated
Gastric Emptying
Glycine max
Vomiting

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