Apr 3, 2016

A Genealogical Look at Shared Ancestry on the X Chromosome

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Vince BuffaloGraham Coop

Abstract

Close relatives can share large segments of their genome identical by descent (IBD) that can be identified in genome-wide polymorphism datasets. There are a range of methods to use these IBD segments to identify relatives and estimate their relationship. These methods have focused on sharing on the autosomes, as they provide a rich source of information about genealogical relationships. We can hope to learn additional information about recent ancestry through shared IBD segments on the X chromosome, but currently lack the theoretical framework to use this information fully. Here, we fill this gap by developing probability distributions for the number and length of X chromosome segments shared IBD between an individual and an ancestor k generations back, as well as between half- and full-cousin relationships. Due to the inheritance pattern of the X and the fact that X homologous recombination only occurs in females (outside of the pseudo-autosomal regions), the number of females along a genealogical lineage is a key quantity for understanding the number and length of the IBD segments shared amongst relatives. When inferring relationships among individuals, the number of female ancestors along a genealogical lineage will often be...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Gene Polymorphism
Patterns
Genome
Pseudo brand of pseudoephedrine
Recombination, Genetic
Genetic Pedigree
Homologous Recombination
X Chromosome
Factor X
Meiosis

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