Nov 9, 2018

A phylogenomic framework, evolutionary timeline, and genomic resources for comparative studies of decapod crustaceans

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Joanna M. WolfeHeather D. Bracken-Grissom

Abstract

Comprising over 15,000 living species, decapods (crabs, shrimp, and lobsters) are the most instantly recognizable crustaceans, representing a considerable global food source. Although decapod systematics have received much study, limitations of morphological and Sanger sequence data have yet to produce a consensus for higher-level relationships. Here we introduce a new anchored hybrid enrichment kit for decapod phylogenetics designed from genomic and transcriptomic sequences that we used to capture new high-throughput sequence data from 94 species, including 58 of 179 extant decapod families, and 11 of 12 major lineages. The enrichment kit yields 410 loci (>86,000 bp) conserved across all lineages of Decapoda, eight times more molecular data than any prior study. Phylogenomic analyses recover a robust decapod tree of life strongly supporting the monophyly of all infraorders, and monophyly of each of the reptant, 'lobster', and 'crab' groups, with some results supporting pleocyemate monophyly. We show that crown decapods diverged in the Late Ordovician and most crown lineages diverged in the Triassic-Jurassic, highlighting a cryptic Paleozoic history, and post-extinction diversification. New insights into decapod relationships p...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Crabs
CFC1 gene
Genome
Class crustacea
Cancer Genus
Science of Morphology
Genomic Stability
Infraorder
Morphological

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