Oct 24, 2019

A placebo-controlled trial of folic acid and betaine in identical twins with Angelman syndrome

Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases
Julia HanVirginia Kimonis

Abstract

Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is caused by maternal genetic deficiency of a gene that encodes E6-AP ubiquitin-protein ligase (gene symbol UBE3A) mapping to chromosome 15q11-q13. AS leads to stiff and jerky gait, excess laughter, seizures, and severe intellectual disability. In some parts of the brain, the paternally inherited UBE3A gene is subject to genomic imprinting by the action of the UBE3A-antisense transcript (UBE3A-ATS) on the paternally inherited allele. Consequently, only the maternally inherited UBE3A gene is expressed in mature neurons. AS occurs due to deletions of the maternal 15q11 - 13 region, paternal uniparental disomy (UPD), imprinting center defects, mutations in the maternal UBE3A gene, or other unknown genetic malfunctions that result in a silenced maternal UBE3A gene in the specific imprinted regions of the brain. A potential treatment strategy for AS is to increase methylation of UBE3A-ATS to promote expression of the paternal UBE3A gene and thus ameliorate the clinical phenotypes of AS. We treated two sets of male identical twins with class I deletions with a 1 year treatment trial of either betaine and folic acid versus placebo. We found no statistically significant chang...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Treatment Protocols
Scientific Study
Genome
Genes
Neurons
Brain
Gene Deletion
Neurodevelopmental Disorders
UBE3A gene

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Angelman Syndrome

Angelman syndrome is a neurogenetic imprinting disorder caused by loss of the maternally inherited UBE3A gene and is characterized by generalized epilepsy, limited expressive speech, sleep dysfunction, and movement disorders. Here is the latest research.

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