PMID: 9387094Aug 1, 1997Paper

Aberrant glycolytic metabolism of cancer cells: a remarkable coordination of genetic, transcriptional, post-translational, and mutational events that lead to a critical role for type II hexokinase

Journal of Bioenergetics and Biomembranes
S P MathupalaP L Pedersen

Abstract

For more than two-thirds of this century we have known that one of the most common and profound phenotypes of cancer cells is their propensity to utilize and catabolize glucose at high rates. This common biochemical signature of many cancers, particularly those that are poorly differentiated and proliferate rapidly, has remained until recently a "metabolic enigma." However, with many advances in the biological sciences having been applied to this problem, cancer cells have begun to reveal their molecular strategies in maintaining an aberrant metabolic behavior. Specifically, studies performed over the past two decades in our laboratory demonstrate that hexokinase, particularly the Type II isoform, plays a critical role in initiating and maintaining the high glucose catabolic rates of rapidly growing tumors. This enzyme converts the incoming glucose to glucose-6-phosphate, the initial phosphorylated intermediate of the glycolytic pathway and an important precursor of many cellular "building blocks." At the genetic level the tumor cell adapts metabolically by first increasing the gene copy number of Type II hexokinase. The enzyme's gene promoter, in turn, shows a wide promiscuity toward the signal transduction cascades active wit...Continue Reading

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