Feb 1, 1975

Acceleration of autoimmunity in NZB/NZW F1 mice by graft-versus-host disease

Clinical and Experimental Immunology
R GoldblumN Talal

Abstract

Chronic graft-versus-host (GVH) disease was induced in NZB/NZW F1 (B/W) hybrid female mice by the weekly injection of parental NZB spleen cells. Control mice received injections of syngeneic spleen cells only. The mice were assayed for antibodies to [3H]DNA and [3H]polyadenylic-polyuridylic acid by a cellulose ester filter radioimmunoassay, and for antibody to thymocytes by a cytotoxicity method. GVH disease accelerated the development of all three antibodies in B/W mice. In addition, sucrose density gradient ultracentrifugation of pooled sera suggested that an accelerated switch from 19S to 7S anti-DNA production may be an early effect of GVH. The mechanism of acceleration is discussed in terms of immunological and viral factors generated by the GVH reaction.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Centrifugation, Density Gradient
Autoantibodies
Poly A-U
T-Lymphocyte
Spleen
Graft-vs-Host Disease
Thymocyte
Mice, Inbred NZB
Graft Vs Host Reaction
Phosphoglycerate Dehydrogenase Activity

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