Nov 1, 1975

Acute otitis media. A clinical bacteriological and serological study of children with frequent episodes of acute otitis media

Acta Oto-laryngologica
P Branefors-HelanderO Nylén

Abstract

A series of episodes of acute otitis media was studied with reference to bacterial findings and specific serological responses in 48 children with histories of frequent episodes before. D. pneumoniae and H. influenzae were the most frequently isolated pathogens. Re-isolations after therapy were often made in episodes with slow healing or therapeutic failure. Most children harboured pathogens in nasopharynx even when they had no signs of respiratory tract infections. Homologous relapses were seen only in few cases and never with pneumococcus type 3 and only once with H. influenzae type b. Specific serological responses were demonstrable generally in children over 2 years of age. D. pneumococcus type 3 and H. influenzae type b generally provoked antibody response. No levels indicating immunoglobulin deficiencies could be found in the children.

  • References15
  • Citations35

Mentioned in this Paper

Nasopharyngeal Diseases
Haemophilus influenzae
Immunoglobulin Activity
Nasopharynx
Acute Disease
Immunoglobulins
Antibody Formation
IgA2
Antibody Studies (Procedure)
IgM2

About this Paper

Related Feeds

Bacterial Pneumonia (ASM)

Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. Here is the latest research.

Antibodies: Agglutination

Antibody-mediated agglutination is the clumping of cells in the presence of antibody, which binds multiple cells together. This enhances the clearance of pathogens. Find the latest research on antibody-mediated agglutination here.

Bacterial Pneumonia

Bacterial pneumonia is a prevalent and costly infection that is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients of all ages. Here is the latest research.