Aug 22, 2017

Adherence to the 2015 Dutch dietary guidelines and risk of non-communicable diseases and mortality in the Rotterdam Study

European Journal of Epidemiology
Trudy VoortmanJosje D Schoufour

Abstract

We aimed to evaluate the criterion validity of the 2015 food-based Dutch dietary guidelines, which were formulated based on evidence on the relation between diet and major chronic diseases. We studied 9701 participants of the Rotterdam Study, a population-based prospective cohort in individuals aged 45 years and over [median 64.1 years (95%-range 49.0-82.8)]. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline with a food-frequency questionnaire. For all participants, we examined adherence (yes/no) to fourteen items of the guidelines: vegetables (≥200 g/day), fruit (≥200 g/day), whole-grains (≥90 g/day), legumes (≥135 g/week), nuts (≥15 g/day), dairy (≥350 g/day), fish (≥100 g/week), tea (≥450 mL/day), ratio whole-grains:total grains (≥50%), ratio unsaturated fats and oils:total fats (≥50%), red and processed meat (<300 g/week), sugar-containing beverages (≤150 mL/day), alcohol (≤10 g/day) and salt (≤6 g/day). Total adherence was calculated as sum-score of the adherence to the individual items (0-14). Information on disease incidence and all-cause mortality during a median follow-up period of 13.5 years (range 0-27.0) was obtained from data collected at our research center and from medical records. Using Cox proportional-hazards models adj...Continue Reading

  • References32
  • Citations14

References

  • References32
  • Citations14

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Research Organization
Diabetes Mellitus, Non-Insulin-Dependent
Dietary Intake
Diet
Grains
Beverages
Follow-up
Lung
Food
Chronic Disease

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