Adsorptive stripping voltammetry of hen-egg-white-lysozyme via adsorption-desorption at an array of liquid-liquid microinterfaces

Analytical Chemistry
Eva Alvarez de Eulate, Damien W M Arrigan

Abstract

Electrochemical adsorption and voltammetry of hen-egg-white-lysozyme (HEWL) was studied at an array of microinterfaces between two immiscible electrolyte solutions (μITIES). Adsorption of the protein was achieved at an optimal applied potential of 0.95 V, after which it was desorbed by a voltammetric scan to lower potentials. The voltammetric peak recorded during the desorption scan was dependent on the adsorption time and on the aqueous phase concentration of HEWL. The slow approach to saturation or equilibrium indicated that protein reorganization at the interface was the rate-determining step and not diffusion to the interface. For higher concentrations and longer adsorption times, a HEWL multilayer surface coverage of 550 pmol cm(-2) was formed, on the basis of the assumption that a single monolayer corresponded to a surface coverage of 13 pmol cm(-2). Implementation of adsorption followed by voltammetric detection as an adsorptive stripping voltammetric approach to HEWL detection demonstrated a linear dynamic range of 0.05-1 μM and a limit of detection of 0.03 μM, for 5 min preconcentration in unstirred solution; this is a more than 10-fold improvement over previous HEWL detection methods at the ITIES. These results provid...Continue Reading

References

Jan 1, 1983·Annual Review of Microbiology·G D Shockman, J F Barrett
Mar 17, 1999·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·S Lee-HuangH C Chen
Mar 13, 2003·Journal of Tropical Pediatrics·O P MishraB K Das
Sep 25, 2003·Journal of the American Chemical Society·Shigeru AmemiyaTracy L Wazenegger
Oct 20, 2004·Langmuir : the ACS Journal of Surfaces and Colloids·J Mieke KleijnMartien A Cohen Stuart
Mar 1, 2005·Vaccine·Jiri MesteckyCharles O Elson
Jun 14, 2006·Langmuir : the ACS Journal of Surfaces and Colloids·Mariko ShinshiMasahiro Goto
May 23, 2007·Langmuir : the ACS Journal of Surfaces and Colloids·Alfonso BerduqueDamien W M Arrigan
Jun 26, 2008·Analytical Chemistry·Micheál D ScanlonDamien W M Arrigan
Aug 1, 2008·Langmuir : the ACS Journal of Surfaces and Colloids·Francine KivlehanDamien W M Arrigan
Jun 13, 2009·The Journal of Physical Chemistry. B·Karina Kubiak, Paul A Mulheran
May 14, 2010·Langmuir : the ACS Journal of Surfaces and Colloids·Toshiyuki OsakaiHajime Katano
Jun 11, 2010·Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics : PCCP·Micheál D ScanlonDamien W M Arrigan

Citations

Dec 15, 2012·Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry·Eva Alvarez de EulateDamien W M Arrigan
Mar 19, 2013·Analytica Chimica Acta·Grégoire Herzog, Valerio Beni
Dec 25, 2012·Analytical Chemistry·Shane O'Sullivan, Damien W M Arrigan
Jul 26, 2012·Chemistry, an Asian Journal·Eva Alvarez de EulateDamien W M Arrigan
Mar 8, 2016·The Journal of Physical Chemistry. B·Mahreen AroojRicardo L Mancera
Mar 31, 2015·Analytical Chemistry·Yang LiuDamien W M Arrigan
Dec 24, 2013·Electrochimica Acta·Shigeru AmemiyaRyoichi Ishimatsu
Dec 18, 2020·Bioelectrochemistry·Shaheda Zannah, Damien W M Arrigan

Related Concepts

Lysozyme, chicken egg white
Adsorption
Electrolytes
Miniaturization
Leftose
Solutions
Electrochemical Techniques
Adsorption
Surface
Scanning

Related Feeds

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.

Bacterial Cell Wall Structure (ASM)

Bacterial cell walls are made of peptidoglycan (also called murein), which is made from polysaccharide chains cross-linked by unusual peptides containing D-amino acids. Here is the latest research on bacterial cell wall structures.