Mar 13, 2020

Adult cochlear implant recipients and meningitis in New Zealand: are patients receiving the recommended immunisations?

The New Zealand Medical Journal
Scott MitchellMichel Neeff

Abstract

To investigate if adult cochlear implant (CI) recipients have received the recommended immunisations as compared to current guidelines and to report instances of meningitis within this population. Telephone interview of CI recipient's general practitioner (GP) surgeries for details regarding immunisations received. Subsequent reporting of immunisation rates of adult patients, under the care of the Northern Cochlear Implant Programme (NCIP) in New Zealand, when compared to the recommended guidelines from the Immunisation Advisory Centre (IMAC) and rates of meningitis of CI recipients are presented. It is recommended to immunise against the most common organisms causing meningitis, Streptococcus pneumoniae and Haemophilus influenzae type b (HiB), as well as influenza. Data for 135 CI recipients over the last five years was complete. 14.8% of patients had received a full pneumococcal immunisation schedule. 11.9% had received a HiB immunisation and 62.2% an influenza vaccination. No patient had developed meningitis following CI insertion. This paper highlights clear issues with the immunisation of adult CI recipients.

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Mentioned in this Paper

North
General Practitioners
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Meningitis
Operative Surgical Procedures
Vaccination
Haemophilus influenzae
Cochlear Implant Procedure
National Cancer Advisory Board
Influenza Vaccination

About this Paper

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