May 10, 1976

An essential residue at the active site of aspartate transcarbamylase

The Journal of Biological Chemistry
E R Kantrowitz, W N Lipscomb

Abstract

Reaction of phenylglyoxal with aspartate transcarbamylase and its isolated catalytic subunit results in complete loss of enzymatic activity. This modification reaction is markedly influenced by pH and is partially reversible upon dialysis. Carbamyl phosphate or carbamyl phosphate with succinate partially protect the catalytic subunit and the native enzyme from inactivation by phenylglyoxal. In the native enzyme complete protection from inactivation is afforded by N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate. The decrease in enzymatic activity correlates with the modification of 6 arginine residues on each aspartate transcarbamylase molecule, i.e. 1 arginine per catalytic site. The data suggest that the essential arginine is involved in the binding of carbamyl phosphate to the enzyme. Reaction of the single thiol on the catalytic chain with 2-chloromercuri-4-nitrophenol does not prevent subsequent reaction with phenylglyoxal. If N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate is used to protect the active site we find that phenylglyoxal also causes the loss of activation of ATP and inhibition by CTP. The rate of loss of heterotropic effects is exactly the same for both nucleotides indicating that the two opposite regulatory effects originate at the same locat...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Arginine hydrochloride
Mercury
2-chloromercuri-4-nitrophenol
Alkalescens-Dispar Group
Organometallic Compounds
Succinates
Sulfhydryl Compounds
Plasma Protein Binding Capacity
Carbamyl Phosphate
Succinate

About this Paper

Related Feeds

ASBMB Publications

The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) includes the Journal of Biological Chemistry, Molecular & Cellular Proteomics, and the Journal of Lipid Research. Discover the latest research from ASBMB here.