PMID: 3967203Mar 1, 1985Paper

Analysis of results of radiation therapy for Stage II carcinoma of the cervix

Cancer
G S MontanaY Mack

Abstract

From April 1969 through December 1980, 251 patients with invasive, epidermoid carcinoma of the cervix received radical radiation therapy consisting of a combination of external beam and intracavitary therapy designed to deliver 7000 to 8000 rad to Point A and 6000 to 6500 rad to the pelvic lymph nodes. The disease-free survival at 2, 5, and 10 years for patients with Stage IIA disease was 90%, 76%, and 76%, respectively, whereas for patients with Stage IIB disease it was 77%, 62%, and 59%, respectively. The survival for the entire group at 2, 5, and 10 years was 80%, 65%, and 62%, respectively. Sixty-eight patients had a recurrence within the irradiated volume, for a locoregional recurrence rate of 27% (68/251). In 49 patients complications developed for an overall complication rate of 19.5% (49/251). An analysis of the complications and their degree of severity revealed a correlation with the dose of intracavitary plus external beam therapy given to Point A and to the rectum. The mean dose to Point A for patients with and without complications were 7877 rad (standard error [SE] +/- 95) and 7593 rad (SE +/- 67), respectively. The mean rectal dose for patients with and without intestinal complications were 6767 rad (SE +/- 157) ...Continue Reading

References

Jan 1, 1979·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·W K TakG W Mitchell
Mar 1, 1979·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·M A TavaresM Santos
May 1, 1977·Acta Radiologica: Therapy, Physics, Biology·J E Johnsson
May 1, 1977·Acta Radiologica: Therapy, Physics, Biology·A Bosch, Z Frias
Nov 1, 1980·The Australian & New Zealand Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology·S L Townsend, G R Kurrle
Jan 1, 1983·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·G S MontanaB B McCafferty
Apr 1, 1980·British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology·B Jolles

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Citations

Jan 1, 1990·Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics·G RalphW Lichtenegger
Jan 1, 1989·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·G S Montana, W C Fowler
Mar 30, 1995·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·L B MarksM S Anscher
May 1, 1991·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·M Van Lancker, G Storme
Jan 1, 1991·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·L V MarcialG E Hanks
Sep 1, 1990·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·H R MadduxJ G Rosenman
Nov 15, 1993·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·D W BrunerG E Hanks
Mar 1, 1987·International Journal of Radiation Oncology, Biology, Physics·S A AristizabalD Sim
Dec 1, 1988·Baillière's Clinical Obstetrics and Gynaecology·E BurghardtM Lahousen
Jan 1, 1988·Gynecologic Oncology·J A StrykerJ Shafer
Feb 16, 2006·Clinical Oncology : a Journal of the Royal College of Radiologists·E P SaibishkumarS C Sharma
Dec 1, 1988·Radiotherapy and Oncology : Journal of the European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology·G SinistreroP Zola
Jan 1, 1986·Cancer·G S MontanaL Shemanski
Jan 1, 1997·Veterinary Clinical Pathology·Kathleen M. HolanCheryl L. Swenson
Jan 1, 1997·Veterinary Clinical Pathology·Phillip ClarkLisa K. Ulrich

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