Oct 27, 2005

Animal models of tuberculosis

Tuberculosis
U D Gupta, V M Katoch

Abstract

It was Robert Koch who recognized the spectrum of pathology of tuberculosis (TB) in different animal species. The examination of clinical specimens from infected humans and animals confirmed the variable patterns of pathological reactions in different species. Guinea pigs are innately susceptible while humans, mice and rabbits show different level of resistance depending upon their genotype. The studies of TB in laboratory animals such as mice, rabbits and guinea pigs have significantly increased our understanding of the aetiology, virulence and pathogenesis of the disease. The introduction of less than five virulent organisms into guinea pigs by the respiratory route can produce lung lesions, bacteraemia and fatal diseases, which helped the extrapolation of results of such experiments to humans. The similarities in the course of clinical infection between guinea pigs and humans allow us to model different forms of TB and to evaluate the protective efficacy of candidate vaccines in such systems. The only limitation of this model, however, is a dearth of immunological reagents that are required for the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of the immune responses, with special reference to cytokines and cell phenotypes. Anothe...Continue Reading

  • References59
  • Citations65

Mentioned in this Paper

Immune Response
Pathogenic Aspects
Methylobacter bovis
Necrosis
T-Lymphocyte
Pathogenesis
Pathogenicity
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Lung
Tuberculosis

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