Antibiotic sensitivity testing of anaerobic bacteria by the breakpoint method

Chemotherapy
U Höffler, G Pulverer

Abstract

A shortened form of the agar dilution procedure (breakpoint method) was studied for susceptibility testing of 363 strains of anaerobic bacteria under routine conditions. Mezlocillin inhibited 99%, piperacillin 96%, cefoxitin 99%, latamoxef 90%, clindamycin 96% and metronidazole 100% of Bacteriodaceae strains tested. Peptococcaceae were susceptible to penicillins, cephalosporins and metronidazole. We did not find noticeable resistance of Clostridium perfringens strains to beta-lactam antibiotics or metronidazole, but to tetracycline and clindamycin. Propionibacteria were fully susceptible to beta-lactam antibiotics, tetracycline, erythromycin and clindamycin.

Citations

Apr 1, 1987·The British Journal of Ophthalmology·G WilliamsK McClellan
May 1, 1997·Australian Veterinary Journal·D G BucknellK Whithear
Feb 1, 1987·Acta Pathologica, Microbiologica, Et Immunologica Scandinavica. Section B, Microbiology·J E Jansen, A Bremmelgaard
Mar 1, 1987·Journal of Clinical Microbiology·M D RowlandJ W Lewis

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