Dec 19, 2016

Anticonvulsant efficacy of antihistamine cyproheptadine in rats exposed to the chemical warfare nerve agent soman

Neurotoxicology
Jennifer L WinklerRobert K Kan

Abstract

Organophosphate compounds, such as soman and sarin, are highly toxic chemical warfare nerve agents that cause a build-up of acetylcholine in synapses and neuromuscular junctions. Current therapies aim to prevent seizures and protect against brain injury following exposure. The present study was designed to evaluate the effectiveness of the antihistamine cyproheptadine in improving survival and controlling seizures in rats exposed to soman. Rats were pretreated with the oxime reactivator HI-6 (125mg/kg, ip) 30min prior to soman exposure (225μg/kg, sc) and then treated with atropine methylnitrate (AMN, 2.0mg/kg, im) 1min after soman. Cyproheptadine (10, 13, 16 or 20mg/kg, ip) was given at one of three time points: 1min after soman intoxication, at the onset of soman-induced seizures or 5min after seizure onset. Control animals were exposed to soman and given an equivalent volume of sterile water instead of cyproheptadine. The incidence of seizures, mortality, neuron counts, neuropathology and apoptosis in specific regions of the brain were evaluated. In animals given HI-6 and AMN the incidence of soman-induced seizure and mortality rate within the first 24h were 100%. When cyproheptadine was given at a dose of 13 or 20mg/kg 1min ...Continue Reading

  • References25
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References

  • References25
  • Citations1

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Study
Brain Injuries
Alcoholic Intoxication
Anticonvulsants
Oximes
Soman
Neurons
Brain
Antihistamine [EPC]
Single Seizure

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