Application of fluorescent nanocrystals (q-dots) for the detection of pathogenic bacteria by flow-cytometry

Journal of Fluorescence
Eran ZahavyShmuel Yitzhaki

Abstract

Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals (q-dots) benefit from practical features such as high fluorescence intensity, broad excitation band and emission diameter dependency. These unique spectroscopic characterizations make q-dots excellent candidates for new fluorescent labels in multi-chromatic analysis, such as Flow-Cytometry (FCM). In this work we shall present new possibilities of multi-labeling and multiplex analysis of pathogenic bacteria, by Flow-Cytometry (FCM) analysis and new specific IgG-q-dots conjugates. We have prepared specific conjugates against B. anthracis spores (q-dots585-IgGalphaB. anthracis and q-dots655-IgGalphaB.anthracis). These conjugates enabled us to achieve double staining of B. anthracis spores which improve the FCM analysis specificity versus control Bacillus spores. Moreover, multiplexed analysis of B. anthracis spores and Y. pestis bacteria was achieved by using specific antibodies labeled with different q-dots to obtain: q-dots585-IgGalphaB. anthracis and q-dots655-IgGalphaY.pestis, each characterized by its own emission peak as a marker. Specific and sensitive multiplex analysis for both pathogens has been achieved, down to 10(3) bacteria per ml in the sample.

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Citations

Mar 31, 2010·Analytical and Bioanalytical Chemistry·Frederik Hammes, Thomas Egli
Mar 31, 2010·Journal of Fluorescence·Filomena SilvaFernanda Conceição Domingues
Apr 20, 2010·Journal of Microbiological Methods·Shilpakala Sainath RaoChintamani D Atreya
May 20, 2015·Applied Biochemistry and Biotechnology·Joungmok KimMoon-Young Yoon
Mar 3, 2018·Toxins·Miloslava DuracovaJiri Dresler
Oct 6, 2020·Frontiers in Bioengineering and Biotechnology·Shehla MunirSuvash Chandra Ojha

Related Concepts

Flow Cytometry
IgG2B
Light
Phylogeny
Scattering, Radiation
Spores, Bacterial
Staining and Labeling
Yersinia pestis
Biosensing Techniques
Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer

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