Aptamer Based Ellipsometric Sensor for Ultrasensitive Determination of Aminoglycoside Group Antibiotics from Dairy Products

Journal of the Science of Food and Agriculture
Mustafa Oğuzhan Cağlayan

Abstract

Residual antibiotics are taken along with food consumed through the food chain is the main cause of the super-bacteria and may damage organs such as liver and kidney. Therefore, monitoring residual antibiotic levels of products in the food chain is both important and a requirement. Maximum residual limits for kanamycin and neomycin are 150 ng mL-1 and 500 ng mL-1 respectively, which are challenging for most sensor platforms. In this paper, a novel method is presented for the determination of antibiotics residues in animal-derived foods. Aptamer based kanamycin and neomycin biosensor based on the spectroscopic ellipsometer and the surface plasmon resonance-enhanced total internal reflection ellipsometer methods as transducing element were developed. Detection limits of both sensor platforms were in 0.1-1 nM ranges and detection range was between the detection limit and 1000 nM. Both ellipsometry based aptasensors can be used as an alternative to the existing ELISA-based method in terms of assay time (10 min.), detection limit (0.22 ng mL-1 for neomycin and 0.048 ng mL-1 for kanamycin) and detection range. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

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Related Concepts

Antibiotics
Antibiotics, Aminoglycoside
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Food
Kanamycin A
Kidney
Laboratory Procedures
Liver
Neomycin
Organ

Related Feeds

Aminoglycosides (ASM)

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.

Aminoglycosides

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.