Oct 24, 2019

Are genetic and idiopathic forms of Parkinson's disease the same disease?

Journal of Neurochemistry
L Correia GuedesJoaquim J Ferreira

Abstract

Genetic forms represent a small fraction of Parkinson's disease (PD) but their discovery has revolutionized research in the field, putting α-synuclein in the spotlight, and uncovering other key neuropathological mechanisms of the disease. The question of whether genetic and idiopathic PD (iPD) correspond to a same disease entity is not simply philosophical, has implications for the discovery of the biological background of PD and for the development of novel therapeutic strategies that may also be applicable to the larger iPD group. Here, we review the current landscape of what has been labeled genetic PD and critically discuss the rational for merging or separating genetic and idiopathic forms of PD as the same or different disease entities. We conclude by addressing the potential implications for future research.

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Alpha-Synuclein
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