Sep 25, 2007

Are S-layers exoskeletons? The basic function of protein surface layers revisited

Journal of Structural Biology
Harald Engelhardt

Abstract

Surface protein or glycoprotein layers (S-layers) are common structures of the prokaryotic cell envelope. They are either associated with the peptidoglycan or outer membrane of bacteria, and constitute the only cell wall component of many archaea. Despite their occurrence in most of the phylogenetic branches of microorganisms, the functional significance of S-layers is assumed to be specific for genera or groups of organisms in the same environment rather than common to all prokaryotes. Functional aspects have usually been investigated with isolated S-layer sheets or proteins, which disregards the interactions between S-layers and the underlying cell envelope components. This study discusses the synergistic effects in cell envelope assemblies, the hypothetical role of S-layers for cell shape formation, and the existence of a common function in view of new insights.

  • References74
  • Citations67

References

  • References74
  • Citations67

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Electron Microscope Tomography
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Microorganism
S-layer proteins
Staphylothermus marinus
Trichomonas tenax
Bacterial Proteins
Tissue Membrane
Toechima tenax
Outer Membrane

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