PMID: 15393Jan 1, 1977

ATP-ase activity in the odontoblastic layer of rat incisor. Determination with a radiochemical and a colorimetric method

Acta Odontologica Scandinavica
G Granström, A Linde

Abstract

The ATP-splitting enzyme activity in odontoblasts isolated from rat incisors has been studied by means of a radiochemical and a colorimetric micromethod. The results with the two methods were virtually identical. The reaction was linear with time for at least 45 min. The pH optimum was found to be 9.8 independently of the ATP concentration. Maximal substrate saturation occurred at a total ATP concentration of 3 mM. Ca2+ and Mg2+ ions activated ATP degradation. F-ions did not affect the activity at low concentrations, whereas higher concentrations were inhibitory. Na+ and ions were slightly inhibitory. Urea inhibited the enzyme activity at concentrations above 1.5 M, while EDTA and EGTA were strong inhibitors at very low concentrations. When incubating in the presence of low concentrations of specific inhibitors for nonspecific alkaline phosphatase, levamisole and R8231, about 20% ATP degrading enzyme activity remained. In conclusion it is suggested that there are at least two ATP degrading phosphatases active at alkaline pH.

References

Jan 1, 1975·Acta Odontologica Scandinavica·H FredénB C Magnusson
May 1, 1975·The Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry : Official Journal of the Histochemistry Society·A Linde, B C Magnusson
Dec 1, 1971·Analytical Biochemistry·P H Cartier, L Thuillier
Jan 1, 1974·Calcified Tissue Research·B C MagnussonT Arwill
Jan 1, 1971·Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research·J H WöltgensO L Bijvoet
Jan 1, 1970·Calcified Tissue Research·J H WöltgensO L Bijvoet
Mar 29, 1960·Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences·M S BURSTONE

Citations

Jul 3, 1979·Calcified Tissue International·G GranströmA Linde
Jan 1, 1981·European Journal of Biochemistry·M ZanettiA Linde
Jan 1, 1991·Scandinavian Journal of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery and Hand Surgery·G GranströmB C Magnusson

Related Concepts

DNA-dependent ATPase
Colorimetry
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Incisor
Odontoblasts
Osmolality

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