Jul 3, 2008

ATR: an essential regulator of genome integrity

Nature Reviews. Molecular Cell Biology
Karlene A Cimprich, David Cortez

Abstract

Genome maintenance is a constant concern for cells, and a coordinated response to DNA damage is required to maintain cellular viability and prevent disease. The ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) and ATM and RAD3-related (ATR) protein kinases act as master regulators of the DNA-damage response by signalling to control cell-cycle transitions, DNA replication, DNA repair and apoptosis. Recent studies have provided new insights into the mechanisms that control ATR activation, have helped to explain the overlapping but non-redundant activities of ATR and ATM in DNA-damage signalling, and have clarified the crucial functions of ATR in maintaining genome integrity.

Mentioned in this Paper

Cell Cycle Proteins
Post-Translational Protein Processing
Genomic Stability
Apoptosis
Protein KINASE
Nucleolar Proteins
TOPBP1 protein, human
Ataxia Telangiectasia
DNA Damage
DNA Helix Destabilizing Proteins

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