Attachment and spreading of human gingival fibroblasts on potentially bioactive glasses in vitro

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research
L HäkkinenH Larjava

Abstract

The attachment and spreading of cultured fibroblasts on potentially bioactive glasses (bioglasses) of ten different compositions were studied. Human gingival fibroblasts were allowed to attach and spread on bio-glasses for 1-72 h. Unreactive silica glass and cell culture polystyrene served as controls. The attachment and spreading of cells were examined by 3H-thymidine labeling of cells, planimetric analysis, cytological staining, immunocytochemistry, and scanning electron microscopy. The cell attachment to bioglasses and silica glass and the cell spreading on bioglasses were slower and cell morphology more elongated compared to control plastic. In spite of great differences in bioglass compositions no great differences in cell behavior on these surfaces were detected. Thus the initial events in the tissue-implant interface might be independent on the bioglass composition, and furthermore the differences in the organization of the tissue-implant interface in vivo might depend on the nature of the surrounding tissues and subsequent changes of the implant surface and the extracellular environment.

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