PMID: 1125316May 16, 1975Paper

Attempts to detect Agrobacterium tumefaciens and bacteriophage PS8 DNA in crown gall tumors by DNA-DNA-filter hybridization

Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta
S K FarrandM D Chilton

Abstract

A systematic study of the DNA-DNA-filter reaction is presented which measures its ability to detect small amounts of simple DNA (bacterial or bacteriophage) in model mixtures of DNA immobilized on filters. Saturation curves show qualitatively that significant binding occurs when there is 10% Agrobacterium tumefaciens DNA on the filter but not 1%. PS8 bacteriophage DNA is detectable at a level of 0.1%. True saturation is not attained in the bacterial DNA reaction : radioactivity bound represents only 3% of the theoretical saturation value. The bacteriophage DNA reactions attain 15-30% of the expected saturation value. When crown gall tumor DNA filters were tested for the presence of A. tumefaciens or PS8 bacteriophage DNA by saturation reactions, an apparently significant amount of binding was observed compared with usual background levels for heterologous DNA filters. However thermal dissociation profiles revealed that no well-matched duplexes were formed. Normal tobacco callus DNA filters exhibited the same type of binding of labeled DNA to a similar extent (50-100% as much as tumor DNA filters). Both types of DNA-filters bound Bacillus subtilis and bacteriophage T4 DNA as efficiently as A. tumefaciens and PS8 DNA. The high no...Continue Reading

References

Sep 1, 1974·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·M D ChiltonE W Nester
Sep 1, 1974·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·K A Drlicá, C I Kado
Jan 14, 1972·Journal of Molecular Biology·M L BirnstielI F Purdom
Mar 1, 1966·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·A H WhiteleyH R Whiteley
Aug 8, 1970·Life Sciences. Pt. 2: Biochemistry, General and Molecular Biology·B I Srivastava
Jan 6, 1969·Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications·F QuétierE Guillé
Jun 13, 1966·Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications·D T Denhardt
Feb 1, 1974·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·R JohnsonE W Nester

❮ Previous
Next ❯

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Bacteriophage: Phage Therapy

Phage therapy uses bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) to treat bacterial infections and is widely being recognized as an alternative to antibiotics. Here is the latest research.