Jul 22, 2009

Auditorily-induced illusory self-motion: a review

Brain Research Reviews
Aleksander Väljamäe

Abstract

The aim of this paper is to provide a first review of studies related to auditorily-induced self-motion (vection). These studies have been scarce and scattered over the years and over several research communities including clinical audiology, multisensory perception of self-motion and its neural correlates, ergonomics, and virtual reality. The reviewed studies provide evidence that auditorily-induced vection has behavioral, physiological and neural correlates. Although the sound contribution to self-motion perception appears to be weaker than the visual modality, specific acoustic cues appear to be instrumental for a number of domains including posture prosthesis, navigation in unusual gravitoinertial environments (in the air, in space, or underwater), non-visual navigation, and multisensory integration during self-motion. A number of open research questions are highlighted opening avenue for more active and systematic studies in this area.

  • References59
  • Citations21

References

Mentioned in this Paper

Vestibular Cortex
Establishment and Maintenance of Localization
Nystagmus
Muscle Rigidity
Space Perception
Diagnostic Radiology Modality
Optokinetic Nystagmus
Vision
Brain
Entire Auditory System

Related Feeds

Auditory Perception

Auditory perception is the ability to receive and interpret information attained by the ears. Here is the latest research on factors and underlying mechanisms that influence auditory perception.

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.