Aug 1, 1976

Bacterial infection and the asplenic host: a review

The Journal of Trauma
J D Dickerman

Abstract

The risk of bacterial sepsis in the surgically or functionally asplenic host is reviewed. The lowest morbidity occurs in patients splenectomized because of trauma to the spleen; the highest morbidity occurs in patients splenectomized for thalassemia. There is approximately a 50% mortality associated with sepsis secondary to asplenia and the pneumococcus is responsible for over 50% of the cases. Normal spleen function and alteration in host defense occurring as a consequence of asplenia is discussed. Finally, alternatives to and indications for splenectomy as well as prophylactic measures are considered. It is concluded that, at the present time, antibiotic coverage for an indefinite period of time may be indicated for surgically or functionally asplenic patients.

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Mentioned in this Paper

Spleen
Heterotaxy Syndrome
Bacterial Vaccines
Thalassemia
Postoperative Complications
Streptococcus pneumoniae
Splenic Diseases
Sepsis
Minilaparotomy
Pyemia

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