Feb 12, 1998

Bacterial meningitis in the United States in 1995. Active Surveillance Team

The New England Journal of Medicine
Anne SchuchatB A Perkins

Abstract

Before the introduction of the conjugate vaccines, Haemophilus influenzae type b was the major cause of bacterial meningitis in the United States, and meningitis was primarily a disease of infants and young children. We describe the epidemiologic features of bacterial meningitis five years after the H. influenzae type b conjugate vaccines were licensed for routine immunization of infants. Data were collected from active, population-based surveillance for culture-confirmed meningitis and other invasive bacterial disease during 1995 in laboratories serving all the acute care hospitals in 22 counties of four states (total population, more than 10 million). The rates were compared with those for 1986 obtained by similar surveillance. On the basis of 248 cases of bacterial meningitis in the surveillance areas, the rates of meningitis (per 100,000) for the major pathogens in 1995 were Streptococcus pneumoniae, 1.1; Neisseria meningitidis, 0.6; group B streptococcus, 0.3; Listeria monocytogenes, 0.2; and H. influenzae, 0.2. Group B streptococcus was the predominant pathogen among newborns, N. meningitidis among children 2 to 18 years old, and S. pneumoniae among adults. Pneumococcal meningitis had the highest case fatality rate (21 pe...Continue Reading

  • References24
  • Citations462

References

  • References24
  • Citations462

Citations

Mentioned in this Paper

Neisseria meningitidis
Mycoplasma pneumoniae
Haemophilus influenzae
Meningitis, Haemophilus
Pathogenic Organism
Influenza
Haemophilus Vaccines
Vaccines, Conjugate
Etiology
Listeria monocytogenes

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