PMID: 3182493Sep 1, 1988Paper

Baroreceptor-mediated suppression of osmotically stimulated vasopressin in normal humans

Journal of Applied Physiology
S R Goldsmith

Abstract

Increases in central venous pressure and arterial pressure have been reported to have variable effects on normal arginine vasopressin (AVP) levels in healthy humans. To test the hypothesis that baroreceptor suppression of AVP secretion might be more likely if AVP were subjected to a prior osmotic stimulus, we investigated the response of plasma AVP to increased central venous pressure and mean arterial pressure after hypertonic saline in six normal volunteers. Plasma AVP, serum osmolality, heart rate, central venous pressure, mean arterial pressure, and pulse pressure were assessed before and after a 0.06 ml.kg-1.min-1-infusion of 5% saline give over 90 min and then after 10 min of 30 degrees head-down tilt and 10 min of head-down tilt plus lower-body positive pressure. Hypertonic saline increased plasma AVP. After head-down tilt, which did not change heart rate, pulse pressure, or mean arterial pressure but did increase central venous pressure, plasma AVP fell. Heart rate, pulse pressure, and central venous pressure were unchanged from head-down tilt values during lower-body positive pressure, whereas mean arterial pressure increased. Plasma AVP during lower-body positive pressure was not different from that during tilt. Osmol...Continue Reading

Citations

Dec 3, 2010·American Journal of Physiology. Regulatory, Integrative and Comparative Physiology·Feng ChenEmilio Badoer
Aug 18, 2016·European Heart Journal. Cardiovascular Pharmacotherapy·Andreas LundinPeter Lundgren
Aug 26, 2006·Anesthesiology·Tanja A Treschan, Jürgen Peters
Nov 23, 2011·Expert Review of Cardiovascular Therapy·Luna GarganiMihai Gheorghiade
May 17, 2011·Journal of Intensive Care Medicine·Ruediger W Lehrich, Arthur Greenberg
Mar 19, 2013·Expert Opinion on Pharmacotherapy·Dmitry ShchekochikhinRobert W Schrier

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