PMID: 6293532Dec 1, 1982

Beta adrenergic receptors in pigmented ciliary processes

The British Journal of Ophthalmology
G E Trope, B Clark

Abstract

Beta adrenergic receptors from membrane fragments of pigmented sheep eyes were studied and characterised by ligand binding techniques after the removal of melanin. In a representative experiment the beta max (total number of beta receptors) was 394.9 fmol/mg protein. The receptor affinity (Ka) was 440 pM. The potency series of drugs to displace 125I-HYP from the receptors was timolol = (-) propranolol greater than (+) propranolol greater than salbutamol greater than practolol. beta 1 Receptors were not detected in the ciliary processes. beta 2 Receptors were the prominent adrenergic receptors present. The theory as to how beta blockers work in glaucoma, their site of action, and the potential role of beta 2 blockers for use in intraocular pressure control is discussed.

References

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Citations

Jan 1, 1985·Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology = Albrecht Von Graefes Archiv Für Klinische Und Experimentelle Ophthalmologie·D M Gross, N N Share
Jan 1, 1985·Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology = Albrecht Von Graefes Archiv Für Klinische Und Experimentelle Ophthalmologie·B ClarkS J Titinchi
Jan 1, 1989·Pharmacology & Therapeutics·M F Sugrue
Sep 13, 2013·Molecular Therapy : the Journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy·Tamara MartínezAna Isabel Jiménez
Aug 1, 1983·The British Journal of Ophthalmology·A Rushton
Jan 1, 1990·Journal of Ocular Pharmacology·P P ElenaP Lapalus
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Nov 1, 1988·The Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmacology·J A Nathanson, E J Hunnicutt
Feb 1, 1989·Australian and New Zealand Journal of Ophthalmology·I Goldberg
Sep 28, 2017·Expert Opinion on Therapeutic Targets·Jeffrey O'CallaghanPete Humphries
Jan 1, 1985·Journal of Ocular Pharmacology·T Yorio
Jan 1, 1988·Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology·P Lapalus, P P Elena
Apr 17, 2020·Fundamental & Clinical Pharmacology·Jinjin JiangJing Chen

Related Concepts

Iodohydroxybenzylpindolol, 127I-labeled
Sultanol
Plasma Membrane
Ciliary Body
Pigmentation
Visken
Dalzic
Rexigen
Norepinephrine Receptors
Beta-adrenergic receptor

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