Mar 14, 2015

Beyond 2/3 and 1/3: the complex signatures of sex-biased admixture on the X chromosome

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Amy Goldberg, Noah A Rosenberg

Abstract

Sex-biased demography, in which parameters governing migration and population size differ between females and males, has been studied through comparisons of X chromosomes, which are inherited sex-specifically, and autosomes, which are not. A common form of sex bias in humans is sex-biased admixture, in which at least one of the source populations differs in its proportions of females and males contributing to an admixed population. Studies of sex-biased admixture often examine the mean ancestry for markers on the X chromosome in relation to the autosomes. A simple framework noting that in a population with equally many females and males, ![Graphic][1]</img> of X chromosomes appear in females, suggests that the mean X-chromosomal admixture fraction is a linear combination of female and male admixture parameters, with coefficients ![Graphic][2]</img> and ![Graphic][3]</img>, respectively. Extending a mechanistic admixture model to accommodate the X chromosome, we demonstrate that this prediction is not generally true in admixture models, though it holds in the limit for an admixture process occurring as a single event. For a model with constant ongoing admixture, we determine the mean X-chromosomal admixture, comparing admixture ...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Biological Markers
Study
X Chromosome
African American
Radiotherapy Fractionation
Chromosomes
Migration, Cell
Autosome
Population Group

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