Feb 18, 2016

Bimodal occupancy-frequency distributions uncover the importance of regional dynamics in shaping marine microbial biogeography

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Markus V LindhJarone Pinhassi

Abstract

Metapopulation theory developed in terrestrial ecology provides applicable frameworks for interpreting the role of local and regional processes in shaping species distribution patterns. Yet, empirical testing of metapopulation models on microbial communities is essentially lacking. Here we determined regional bacterioplankton dynamics from monthly transect sampling in the Baltic Sea Proper (16 sites, 11 occasions, 2010-2011) using 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing. A strong positive correlation was found between local relative abundance and occupancy of populations. Notably, the occupancy-frequency distributions (the number of populations occupying different number of sites) were significantly bimodal with a satellite mode of mostly rare endemic populations and a core mode of abundant cosmopolitan populations (e.g. Synechococcus, SAR11 and SAR86 clade members). Observed temporal changes in population distributions supported theoretical predictions that stochastic variation in local extinction and colonization rates accounted for observed bimodality. Moreover, bimodality was found for bacterioplankton across the entire Baltic Sea, and was also frequent in globally distributed datasets where average Bray-Curtis distances were signific...Continue Reading

  • References
  • Citations

References

  • We're still populating references for this paper, please check back later.
  • References
  • Citations

Citations

  • This paper may not have been cited yet.

Mentioned in this Paper

Synechococcus
Patterns
Transection
Analysis Using Pyrosequencing
Bacterioplankton
Environment
Site
Microbial
Local
Species

About this Paper

Related Feeds

BioRxiv & MedRxiv Preprints

BioRxiv and MedRxiv are the preprint servers for biology and health sciences respectively, operated by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. Here are the latest preprint articles (which are not peer-reviewed) from BioRxiv and MedRxiv.