Biofilm proteome: homogeneity or versatility?

Journal of Proteome Research
Sébastien VilainThierry Jouenne

Abstract

The problems associated with biofilm infections in humans result from the distinct characteristics of biofilms, in particular their high level of resistance to antibiotics. One of the hypotheses that have been advanced to explain this resistance to antimicrobials is the phenotypic differentiation of biofilm cells. Although many studies on biofilms have highlighted physiological alterations following the attachment of bacteria to a surface, no studies have explicitly demonstrated a "biofilm" physiology. To contribute to this topical debate, we used principal component analysis to interpret spot quantity variations observed on electropherograms obtained by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of crude protein extracts from planktonic and sessile Pseudomonas aeruginosa cells. These analyses showed that the proteome of attached P. aeruginosa cells differs from that of their planktonic counterparts. Furthermore, we found that the proteome of sessile P. aeruginosa is strongly dependent on the nature of the biofilm substratum.

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Related Concepts

Bacterial Proteins
Pseudomonas aeruginosa (antigen)
Antibiotic throat preparations
Antifungal Antibiotics, Topical
Surface Properties
Antibiotics, Gynecological
Cell Differentiation Process
Proteome
Pseudomonas aeruginosa
Multivariate Analysis

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