Bistability and bacterial infections

PloS One
Roy MalkaVered Rom-Kedar

Abstract

Bacterial infections occur when the natural host defenses are overwhelmed by invading bacteria. The main component of the host defense is impaired when neutrophil count or function is too low, putting the host at great risk of developing an acute infection. In people with intact immune systems, neutrophil count increases during bacterial infection. However, there are two important clinical cases in which they remain constant: a) in patients with neutropenic-associated conditions, such as those undergoing chemotherapy at the nadir (the minimum clinically observable neutrophil level); b) in ex vivo examination of the patient's neutrophil bactericidal activity. Here we study bacterial population dynamics under fixed neutrophil levels by mathematical modelling. We show that under reasonable biological assumptions, there are only two possible scenarios: 1) Bacterial behavior is monostable: it always converges to a stable equilibrium of bacterial concentration which only depends, in a gradual manner, on the neutrophil level (and not on the initial bacterial level). We call such a behavior type I dynamics. 2) The bacterial dynamics is bistable for some range of neutrophil levels. We call such a behavior type II dynamics. In the bistab...Continue Reading

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Citations

Jun 3, 2011·Mathematical Biosciences and Engineering : MBE·Roy Malka, Vered Rom-Kedar
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Jul 24, 2012·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·Roy MalkaVered Rom-Kedar
Jul 24, 2012·The Journal of Clinical Investigation·Samuel C Silverstein, Raul Rabadan
Oct 8, 2016·Bulletin of Mathematical Biology·Raluca EftimieDoreen A Cantrell
Jan 23, 2021·Antibiotics·Nelly FrenkelVered Rom-Kedar
May 1, 2021·Molecules : a Journal of Synthetic Chemistry and Natural Product Chemistry·Hamzah Basil MohammedAlina-Maria Holban

Related Concepts

Bacterial Infections
Neutrophil Band Cells
Persons
Neutropenia
Neutrophil
Staphylococcus epidermidis
Neutrophil Count (Procedure)
Acute Infectious Disease
Host Defense
Bactericidal Activity

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An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.