Apr 15, 1993

Brain structures and life-span in primate species

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
J AllmanA Hakeem

Abstract

In haplorhine primates, when the effect of body weight is removed, brain weight is correlated with maximum recorded life-span. In this paper we have analyzed the relationships between volumes of specific brain structures and life-span. When the effect of body weight is removed, the volumes of many brain structures are significantly, positively correlated with maximum recorded life-span. However, the volumes of the medulla and most first-order sensory structures do not correlate with life-span. The cerebellum is the brain structure that best correlates with life-span. Parts of the cerebellum are particularly vulnerable to age-related loss of mass in humans. For another measure of the life cycle, female reproductive age, a similar set of brain structures is significantly, positively correlated (again with the exceptions of the medulla and most first-order sensory structures). There are some differences between the structures correlated for life-span and female reproductive age. For example, the hippocampus and lateral geniculate nucleus correlate with female reproductive age but do not correlate with life-span. In strepsirhine primates, when the effect of body weight is removed, total brain weight does not significantly correlate...Continue Reading

Mentioned in this Paper

Biological Adaptation to Stress
Entire Lateral Geniculate Body
Blood Pressure Regulation
Entire Medulla Oblongata
Dorsal Nucleus of Lateral Geniculate Body
Sexual Maturation
Tissue Specificity
Brain
Reproduction
Life Extension

About this Paper

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