Mar 29, 2020

Custom-molded headcases have limited efficacy in reducing head motion for fMRI

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Andrew S FoxTal Yarkoni

Abstract

Effectively minimizing head motion continues to be a challenge for the collection of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) data. The development of individual-specific custom molded headcases have been offered as a promising solution to minimizing motion during data collection, but to date, only a single published investigation into their efficacy exists in the literature. That study found headcases to be effective in reducing motion during short resting state fMRI scans (Power et al, 2019). In the present work, we examine the efficacy of these same headcases in reducing motion for a larger group of participants engaged in naturalistic scanning paradigms that consist of long movie-watching scans (~20-45min), as well as speaking aloud inside the MRI. Unlike previous work, we find no reliable reduction in head motion during movie viewing when comparing participants with headcases to those who were simply situated with foam pillows or foam pillows with medical tape. Surprisingly, we also find that for those wearing headcases, head motion is worse while talking relative to those situated with just foam pillows. These differences appear to be driven by large brief rotations of the head as well as translations in the z-plane a...Continue Reading

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Mentioned in this Paper

Genome-Wide Association Study
Meta Analysis (Statistical Procedure)
Genes
ABI1
Functional Neuroimaging
Spatial Distribution
Institution
Candidate Gene Identification
Psychology
Gene Expression

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