DOI: 10.1101/493171Dec 13, 2018Paper

Can cancer GWAS variants modulate immune cells in the tumor microenvironment?

BioRxiv : the Preprint Server for Biology
Yi ZhangJun S. Song

Abstract

Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have hitherto identified several genetic variants associated with cancer susceptibility, but the molecular functions of these risk modulators remain largely uncharacterized. Recent studies have begun to uncover the regulatory potential of non-coding GWAS SNPs by using epigenetic information in corresponding cancer cell types and matched normal tissues. However, this approach does not explore the potential effect of risk germline variants on other important cell types that constitute the microenvironment of tumor or its precursor. This paper presents evidence that the breast cancer-associated variant rs3903072 may regulate the expression of CTSW in tumor infiltrating lymphocytes. CTSW is a candidate tumor-suppressor gene, with expression highly specific to immune cells and also positively correlated with breast cancer patient survival. Integrative analyses suggest a putative causative variant in a GWAS-linked enhancer in lymphocytes that loops to the 3' end of CTSW through three-dimensional chromatin interaction. Our work thus poses the possibility that a cancer-associated genetic variant might regulate a gene not only in the cell of cancer origin, but also in immune cells in the microenvir...Continue Reading

Related Concepts

Malignant Neoplasm of Breast
Malignant Neoplasms
Chromatin
Disease Susceptibility
Genes
Natural Killer Cells
Lymphocyte
Neoplasms
T-Lymphocyte
Protein kinase modulator

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