PMID: 2982745Feb 15, 1985Paper

Capacity of B-lymphocytic lines of diverse tumor origin to produce and respond to B-cell growth factors: a progression model for B-cell lymphomagenesis

International Journal of Cancer. Journal International Du Cancer
J GordonG Klein

Abstract

Human cell lines established from cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, lymphosarcoma, Burkitt's lymphoma and multiple myeloma and representing stages of B-lymphocyte development ranging from pre-B through to plasma cells, were assessed for their ability to produce and respond to B-cell growth factors (BCGF). All B-cell lines studied were found to be constitutive producers of a growth activity which assisted the S-phase entry of normal activated B-cells and provided growth support for lymphoblastoid cells transformed by Epstein-Barr virus. Furthermore, all lines responded by enhanced proliferation to supernatants from a BCGF-producing T-cell hybridoma. Not all lines, however, displayed autostimulation to their own supernatants and no tumor B-cell line appeared totally dependent on soluble factors for its growth. Non-tumorigenic B-cell lines, by contrast, revealed a strict dependency on homologous growth factor for their continued proliferation in suspension culture. The findings support a progression model of lymphomagenesis based upon the utilization, production and, ultimately, emancipation from growth-promoting soluble factors.

References

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Citations

Jun 10, 1986·Journal of Immunological Methods·H AbeJ J Oppenheim
Jun 26, 1987·Journal of Immunological Methods·R J Warrington
Nov 1, 1987·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·A CalenderG M Lenoir
May 16, 1985·Nature·G Klein, E Klein
Jul 1, 1987·Scandinavian Journal of Immunology·E Genot, J P Kolb
Dec 15, 1986·International Journal of Cancer. Journal International Du Cancer·M C FavrotG Lenoir
May 1, 1990·European Journal of Immunology·L H BrentJ L Butler
Nov 25, 1987·Biochimica Et Biophysica Acta·C H HeldinB Westermark
Jan 1, 1986·Medical Oncology and Tumor Pharmacotherapy·P PanayotidesP Reizenstein

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