CD147 promotes MTX resistance by immune cells through up-regulating ABCG2 expression and function

Journal of Dermatological Science
Shuang ZhaoXiang Chen

Abstract

Methotrexate (MTX) is a drug used to treat psoriasis due to inducing immune cell apoptosis. However, certain patients show MTX resistant. CD147, highly expressed by psoriatic PBMCs, is assumed to regulate MTX sensitivity. The underlining mechanism is still relatively understudied. To understand the mechanisms of that CD147 promotes MTX resistance in immune cells. The expression of CD147 and ABCG2 in PBMCs from psoriatic patients, cellular apoptosis and intracellular MTX amount were measured. We also checked the cellular drug sensitivity of CHO (Chinese Hamster Ovary) cell lines with introduced CD147 and Jurkat T cells depeleted CD147. By immunoprecipitation, we detected the interaction between CD147 and ABCG2. Both ABCG2 and CD147 are highly expressed in psoriatic PBMCs. Cultured in vitro, the PBMCs from psoriatic patients were more resistant to MTX-induced apoptosis comparing to PBMCs from healthy people. Further studies demonstrated that exogenous overexpression of CD147 in CHO cells increased ABCG2 protein level. After MTX treatment, CD147 overexpressing CHO cells showed lower apoptosis rate and lower intracellular MTX concentration. On the contrary, knockdown of CD147 by shRNA in Jurkat T cells decreased ABCG2 expression, a...Continue Reading

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Citations

Mar 17, 2015·Journal of Dermatological Science·Tomomitsu Miyagaki, Makoto Sugaya
Dec 18, 2015·Cell Biology International·Yu-Le YongHuijie Bian
Apr 10, 2020·Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology : JEADV·Menglin ChenXiang Chen
Nov 21, 2019·Cancers·Alexandra LandrasSamia Mourah
Dec 13, 2018·Molecular Biotechnology·Xiao-Dong WuZhi-Nan Chen
Jan 2, 2021·International Journal of Molecular Sciences·Amanda B ChaiIngrid C Gelissen
Mar 25, 2019·Life Sciences·Dhivya KumarKrishna Kumar Subramanian

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