CdiA Effectors from Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Use Heterotrimeric Osmoporins as Receptors to Recognize Target Bacteria

PLoS Pathogens
Christina M BeckChristopher S Hayes

Abstract

Many Gram-negative bacterial pathogens express contact-dependent growth inhibition (CDI) systems that promote cell-cell interaction. CDI+ bacteria express surface CdiA effector proteins, which transfer their C-terminal toxin domains into susceptible target cells upon binding to specific receptors. CDI+ cells also produce immunity proteins that neutralize the toxin domains delivered from neighboring siblings. Here, we show that CdiAEC536 from uropathogenic Escherichia coli 536 (EC536) uses OmpC and OmpF as receptors to recognize target bacteria. E. coli mutants lacking either ompF or ompC are resistant to CDIEC536-mediated growth inhibition, and both porins are required for target-cell adhesion to inhibitors that express CdiAEC536. Experiments with single-chain OmpF fusions indicate that the CdiAEC536 receptor is heterotrimeric OmpC-OmpF. Because the OmpC and OmpF porins are under selective pressure from bacteriophages and host immune systems, their surface-exposed loops vary between E. coli isolates. OmpC polymorphism has a significant impact on CDIEC536 mediated competition, with many E. coli isolates expressing alleles that are not recognized by CdiAEC536. Analyses of recombinant OmpC chimeras suggest that extracellular loops...Continue Reading

References

Jun 1, 1982·Journal of Bacteriology·M Mock, A P Pugsley
May 15, 2002·FEMS Microbiology Reviews·Inge Lerouge, Jos Vanderleyden
Dec 10, 2002·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·R A WelchF R Blattner
Oct 7, 2003·Nature Structural Biology·Genji KurisuWilliam A Cramer
Dec 31, 2003·The Journal of Cell Biology·Ian GentleTrevor Lithgow
Aug 20, 2005·Science·Stephanie K AokiDavid A Low
Apr 6, 2006·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·Swaine L ChenJeffrey I Gordon
Jun 6, 2006·Gene·Simanti DattaDonald L Court
Sep 5, 2006·Journal of Molecular Biology·Arnaud BasléT Schirmer
Sep 14, 2006·The Journal of Biological Chemistry·Fernando Garza-SánchezChristopher S Hayes
Mar 10, 2007·Microbiology and Molecular Biology Reviews : MMBR·Eric CascalesDanièle Cavard
Aug 7, 2007·Genome Research·Lise PetersenRasmus Nielsen
Apr 2, 2008·Journal of Molecular Biology·Fernando Garza-SánchezChristopher S Hayes
Jul 19, 2008·The EMBO Journal·Eiki YamashitaWilliam A Cramer
Mar 18, 2009·Infection and Immunity·R Brock Neil, Michael A Apicella
Jun 9, 2009·Nature Reviews. Microbiology·Kirk W DeitschJames R Stringer
Nov 26, 2010·Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America·Nicholas G HousdenColin Kleanthous

Citations

Mar 14, 2017·Trends in Microbiology·Elizabeth S DankaPeggy A Cotter
Mar 22, 2018·Emerging Microbes & Infections·Noha M Elhosseiny, Ahmed S Attia
Dec 2, 2017·Environmental Microbiology·Vera TroseljDaniel Wall
Jun 21, 2018·Molecular Microbiology·Karolina MichalskaChristopher S Hayes
May 1, 2019·Journal of Bacteriology·Jonathan P Allen, Alan R Hauser
Jul 19, 2020·Annual Review of Microbiology·Zachary C RuheChristopher S Hayes
Nov 1, 2017·Emerging Topics in Life Sciences·Allison M JonesChristopher S Hayes
May 26, 2017·Frontiers in Cellular and Infection Microbiology·Jeremy GuérinFrançoise Jacob-Dubuisson
Dec 8, 2020·Frontiers in Microbiology·Hsiao-Han LinErh-Min Lai
Oct 31, 2020·International Journal of Molecular Sciences·Larisa N IkryannikovaAndrey A Zamyatnin
Oct 28, 2017·Current Opinion in Microbiology·Erin C Garcia
Jun 11, 2019·Journal of Molecular Biology·Nicholas L BartelliFrederick W Dahlquist

Methods Mentioned

BETA
flow-cytometry
flow cytometry
PCR

Related Concepts

Related Feeds

Antifungals

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Aminoglycosides

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.

Bacteriophage: Phage Therapy

Phage therapy uses bacterial viruses (bacteriophages) to treat bacterial infections and is widely being recognized as an alternative to antibiotics. Here is the latest research.

Antifungals (ASM)

An antifungal, also known as an antimycotic medication, is a pharmaceutical fungicide or fungistatic used to treat and prevent mycosis such as athlete's foot, ringworm, candidiasis, cryptococcal meningitis, and others. Discover the latest research on antifungals here.

Aminoglycosides (ASM)

Aminoglycoside is a medicinal and bacteriologic category of traditional Gram-negative antibacterial medications that inhibit protein synthesis and contain as a portion of the molecule an amino-modified glycoside. Discover the latest research on aminoglycoside here.

Adhesion Molecules in Health and Disease

Cell adhesion molecules are a subset of cell adhesion proteins located on the cell surface involved in binding with other cells or with the extracellular matrix in the process called cell adhesion. In essence, cell adhesion molecules help cells stick to each other and to their surroundings. Cell adhesion is a crucial component in maintaining tissue structure and function. Discover the latest research on adhesion molecule and their role in health and disease here.